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money into the economy? they let us know the exit plan for all of this. melissa: taxpayer outrage, bankrupt city in california paying out a million dollars in pay raises. they are bankrupt. lori: and paying races? crazy town. fedex says more customers are taking a less expensive option and it is hitting the bottom line. melissa: the cyber threat hit by online hackers putting financial firms here on high alert. but first, time for stocks now. nicole petallides is standing by. stocks posted solid gains ahead of the fed decision. nicole: that is right. everybody focused on the fed about an hour away from now. very accommodated if fed, and we're watching a market hitting new all-time highs in the dow jones industrial. of almost 56 points at the moment showing you some names that hit some highs today including nativ united technolo. hitting the highest levels we've ever seen for those names and we cannot leave out verizon. the highest levels we'v we haven in over 11 years. so while the shareholders have been enjoying great dividends, they can now also note multi-year highs as well. as
say that cyprus' economy is going to be in significant peril in the future. >> warner: and i gather a lot of these big depositors are russians, other foreigners? how much is known about them? >> a lot of the deposits particularly at the major banks are certainly from russians. cyprus has, you know, a long history with russia. in recent years, we had a lot of russians coming to this island basically sort of seeking a safe haven for their money, given some of the instability in russia. what has happened, however, is that that has drawn suspicion over time that, for example, some oligarchs or even some money of questionable origin is in the banking system. that's one reason why european leaders and particularly chancellor angela merkel wanted to take a much closer look at cyprus' banking sector as a part of this whole bailout. >> warner: how fundamentally will the cyprus economy be restructured or changed? >> the cyprus economy basically lives and breathes on finance. ever since it joined the european union it has shifted away from an economy that had produced a lot of goods over many
economy. its banks are not highly connected with the rest of the international financial system. there is no risk of contagion here. >> adam, actually, of all the ideas you laid out, which do you think is the least bad of all those solutions? is it going ahead and letting the banks fail? >> that would be my preferred route. failure implies that the banks can't pay their depositors. they are restructuring. they will be very orderly. basically, the banks would be closed for two days. what would come out is when they reopen, the depositors would be the large depositors because the small depositors would be fully protected. the large depositors would be the owners of a bank and they would have deposits of somewhere between 50 1k3 60 or 70% of their money and the rest of the shares in the new bank. the banks would be solvent. the banks could be highly capitalized and they would then have access to the ecb for refinancing to provide any liquidity. >> and the fallout from that would be that the russians -- >> and basically -- >> the fallout for that is that the russians are the ones wh
safe financial move it could hurt young adults and economy as a whole. brenda buttner, anchor of "bulls and bears." i guess it's a story here is that young people are avoiding debt and not getting sort of themselves mixed up in some of these predatory practices that young people have been the target in the past. so had a part of the story is good, right? >> absolutely. during the great recession everybody stopped using their credit cards but particularly those under 35. especially undergraduates as you brought up. in a sense that is good, whenever you hear from a personal financial expert, get some extra money, pay off your credit card debt, but having no credit and misusing credit are two different things and could have potentially difficult implications for our economy and for these young adults. >> rick: i remember my mother telling me, go and get one credit card, buy something you need but get your books and put it on the card and then pay it off in full. that is the way to start establishing a good credit? >> who is your mom. eileen -- that is good advice to your son. that is exact
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of the economy. consider that here in the united states. our banking system is roughly one-time the size of our economy. what we're waiting to see next are they going to get this through parliament and get it done? it is so controversial they're trying to find out different ways to make it less controversial. impose the tax on larger shareholders to a much greater degree. it was originally 9.9% and you go to 12%. if you didn't want to tax the small guys at all you'd have to go to 15% or 16%. this is the scene when the president walked into the palace headquarters. there were people there with no written on their hand and this says merkel stole our money. keep in mind, european union will still give them 10 billion euros and they were trying to come up to reduce the original size from 17 billion euros. the other thing to keep in mind, by taxing depositors they're taxing a lot of foreigners and a lot of russians who had kept their money. the thing is will the rest of europe, will small depositors across the rest of europ
are not seeing it. >> u.s. has stopped becoming a manufacturing and has become a service economy. >> neil: go ahead, adam. >> charlie was making an interesting pointed. you said earlier why don't unions give in the way the private sector employees have given in in the fact of the matter is a lot of people watch that understand that the benefits aren't very good sometimes. >> private sector gets screwed on everything. >> here is the thing. let me finish. thousand jobs or a thousand workers, those private sector guys getting screwed are a getting hundred guys getting lavish benefits. >> sounds like the grapes of wrath. >> neil: are we forgetting that we as taxpayers fund at least in the case of the public, union members their benefits, their incredibly generous benefits compared to ours? we are paying for them. we fork over the money and pay the bills. i think that is the issue that is lost. hey, taxpayers you are here as a service to me. you help me and i'm paying through the nose for you. >>> when the teachers strike in chicago it makes people angry. they know that, frankly we the american pe
at home, what do we do about our economy so we don't become a cyprus isn't senate passed its first real bottoming proposal in more than four years. but many americans are worried that lawmakers are kicking the can down the road. the majority say they are slightly less nervous about the economy than they were in 2010. an overwhelming number of us think the number-1 challenge to our economy is the continuing, mounting debt. we have a former media spokesperson for george w. bush and a democratic political consultant to hillary clinton for president. mersaides and richard, welcome to both of you. americans are sick of this. look at the debt clock this. thing keeps whizzing up. the debt is mounting. every sunday, i show this. it has gone up another trillions, it seems, theres and multi-millions. mercedes, how do we stop that in its tracks and make it go the other way? >> we can't stop it when you have the budget plan that senator murray has pushed through. 50 of all, because it has such little support from american voters. for example, we saw a poll saying that only 28% of likely voters sup
records, taking, and larryeating bails glazer from the economy summit. and bruce is in pennsylvania where the snow has begun. reporter: well, neil, that heavy snow from this morning has turn into light snow this afternoon and now more of a freezing rain. literally minutes ago the sun made an appears and that is rare. no blizzard here but another significant snowfall. two or throw inches around most of the region, now a slushy mess. it began this morning. we expect it will not wrap up until late tonight. this is actually the 11th day in the month of march with some kind of trace amount of snow or more. none of them any big deal but all of them irritating. last month, one day with a trace of snow. temperatures much colder this march. the average high 15 degrees colder this march than last march, and just two days in the entire month of march that the national weather service would regard as clear, day where the sun was actually out. a fair number of fender benders this morning, but overall more of a slushy mess than a real danger. the temperatures are expected to get down near freezing, so
's going in the wrong direction now. sandra: saying more federal spending will help the economy, not something that all of us believe is true to be the case. >> no, but i got to go back a little bit there. it's absolutely true that he did miscalculate because neither the president nor myself nor many rational people -- sandra: would he admit that? >> yeah, i think he might, i don't know. nobody thought the house republicans were crazy enough to go through this ridiculous -- sandra: were they crazy? the sun came up. we get through the airport lines -- >> let me address that -- you guys had a ball on this, well, the sun came up, nothing changed. you may live to regret that because, you know, these problems are coming, and, in fact, today, michele bachmann, of all people, was decrying the sequester. why? because an airport in her district lost its tower and has been affected. the cuts are coming. in fact, the only thing that's fore stalled it a bit is the deal made on the continuing resolution. sandra: dan, i argue, however, immediately following, we saw the government, the adminis
's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some wealthy russians or wealthy companies that had money in there that they would lose a substantial portion of, perhaps 50% of the uninsured deposits if they do a wind down. if they have a margin call, you know what i'm saying? some kind of ripple effect maybe related to a russian company or a russian individual. but when
for a retirement crisis even as the stock market sits near highs and the economy shows improvement. host: so we're getting your take on this. your retirement andization. tell us if you are and why and if you are not, why not? it's a story in the "usa today" as well this morning confidence in retirement continues to flail about this report, because americans have to cope with many immediate financial concerns retirement is taking a backseat. only 2% of workers and a% of retirees say retirement is their most pressing issues. among other worries -- host: at least many americans have a more realistic perspective about retirement says the senior vice president of retirement and investor services at the principle financial group. host: in arkansas, a democrat, are you saving? caller: yes, i save every penny i can get my hands on. host: 401-k or how are you saving? caller: c.d.'s and bank accounts that are ensured. host: why not put it in the market? caller: i can't afford to lose it. i've seen too many people lose their behinds and with what little money i've saved all my life, i can't afford to lose
of the country. high taxation and high debt are holding back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily b
stand? and israel's minister of the economy is here to answer our questions. >>> plus, mayor michael bloomberg called starbucks ceo ridiculi ridiculist. >>> and the head of colorado's department of corrections answers the door only to be shot down. we take you to the manhunt tonight. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight with friends like these, well, president obama arrived in israel to day. it was his first trip there as president. everything seemed rosey for a little while between him and benjamin netanyahu. >> and just as we have for these past 65 years, the united states is proudo stand with you as your strongest ally and your greatest friend. >> i want to thank you for the investment you have made in our relationship and in strengthening the friendship and alliance between our two countries. >> sounded so perfect. but then -- later in the day things changed. >> iran is a grave threat to israel, a grave threat to the world, a nuclear iran. the united states is committed to dealing with it. >> each country has to make its own decisi
if constant budget deficits are going to ruin the economy they're taking an awful long time about doing so. the real fact about the budget is that the deficit has to be sustainable. but basically the government is a lot more like a company than it is like a household. and a company has debt as part of its permanent capital structure and it can have that debt forever. if the company keeps grog, it can take on more debt. similarly if we run a budget deficit, so long as it is small enough relative to the amount of economy is growing over the long-term that can be sustainable. we have to shrink the budget deficit over time, but not all the way to zero. the democrats are closer to correct on this point where the republicans have been attacking them because their budget doesn't balance over ten years. the budget shouldn't balance over ten years. >> i think you hit a key point. it's all about growth. you can grow your way out of deficits. we saw it during the clinton administration. it's also about looking at how far we've come. if you actually look at what we've already done in terms of getting
demand. moreover because of stronger growth in each economy. it has the beneficial spillovers to trading partners. there will be a test later. thank you. ashley: there are always two sides of the story. central banks have been doing it all around the world. tracy: i know. peter barnes will bring you the q&a session of bernanke's comments when they have been live. ashley: let's check these markets. nicole petallides at the nyse. you are also looking at some big tech names. nicole: i am keeping an eye on blackberry and yahoo!. down almost 3%. goldman sachs downgraded. it is not really up to par and not really doing that well. they are not seeing the sales that they had hoped. let's take a look at yahoo!. it is up one half of 1%. 23.25 a share. back to you. ashley: barely up, but it is up. thank you. tracy: boeing announcing its plan to conduct a 787 and flight today. the troubled dreamliner has been grounded since early january. we heard last week they would do a little test flight. ashley: hopefully no smoke. with the securities and exchange commission approving nasdaq's plan to pay out t
that we can't do anything about climate change that the experts are urging us to do and keep our economy growing. what's the argument to respond to that? >> well, i'll tell you, that is a myth. it's a false choice. it's a zero sum game. you either can grow the economy or you can protect the environment, okay? so i changed the question, and i've been doing this now for several years. i said, okay, here's the question: do you believe that protecting the environment harms the economy and costs jobs, has no impact on the economy or jobs, or actually grows the economy and improves jobs? okay? and what do we find? an overwhelming majority of americans, and i'm talking like two-thirds of americans, say that it either has no impact or it actually improves the economy. in fact, that's the most frequently chosen answer is that most americans don't see this as an inherent contradiction. >> what you're saying is that a big powerful industry controls or affects the outcomes of perception in this country disproportionately to what most people think? >> that's right. and, in part, they're able to do th
. and stay the course. that's the message from the fed chairman ben bernanke today. he says our economy is improving but it still needs help. so the fed will keep interest rates at record low levels and will keep buying $85 billion in bonds each month. stocks like that, the dow up 56 points. briefly hitting a new record. the nasdaq up 25. the s&p up 10. of course, investors the world over are still watching the tiny island nation of cyprus as it nears possible bankruptcy. banks there are closed for the rest of the week now. and lawmakers are working on a plan b after parliament rejected a proposal to tax people's savings accounts. the fox business network peter barnes is live in the newsroom in washington. how concerned is the fed about cyprus? >> well, shep, he said the feted is paying attention to it, monitoring cyprus carefully. he said that so far its problems don't appear to be spreading to the u.s. or other countries. and that's the big concern here that this could become a contagion and trigger another financial crisis. but, bernanke suggested cyprus is unique, that its banking s
have more friction with its neighbors as it expands its military along with its economy. foreign government officials are waiting to see what kind of diplomatic steps will be taken by chinese leaders. >> i think the new chinese government wants to stabilize its external affairs and focus on internal affairs. so it may be willing to stabilize its relationship with japan and the united states and china and stable economic growth are indispensable for achieving the recovery of china's economy. >> he says he is mainly watching two points. one is the possibility of a power struggle in the three-tiered power structure. and the other is china's one-party system. he doubts that the communist party will get enough support from the people in the future. it appears party officials do not intend to democratize the country. >> how long would they be able to avert change? i believe china will face critical moment in five to ten years from now. >> china's president and premier serve five-year terms. they are often re-elected, though, which means xi and li will probably be in charge for the next
. >>> so just where is the economy headed? according to federal reserve chief ben bernanke the economy is improving. however, interest rates will stay low now until unemployment falls below 6.5%. >>> more news from nike after the bell investors will look at nike's future orders. china trends. and gross margins for a read on consumer demand in china and here at home. >>> expectations are climbing for home sales. >>> cash-strapped cyprus banks are still closed and late night meetings broke up with no new plan b to fund the island's much need bailout. the european central bank gave cyprus until monday to work out a deal or be cut off from emergency funding. >>> closer to home, cvs is weighing in on its controversial policy to require employees to report their weight and body fat or face a health insurance premium increase. the company insists all data collected during health screenings is private. >>> fans of starbucks will be happy to know beginning in may they can also rack up rewards points with packaged coffee purchases at grocery and drugstores. >>> meanwhile, walmart is expanding it
. let's listen. >> due to the influx and further strained the economy that is already under considerable external pressures with an unstable region, the ghoebl economy recovering. but having said that as i already alluded to, we are so grateful to the u.s. assistance in solving this enormous responsibility and together continue to appeal to international community for more help to face this calamity. i had the opportunity, obviously, to talk about the peace process and we're very delighted by the vision and depth of wisdom the president showed over the past several days with israelis and palestinians. and obviously reiterate jordan's commitment to the peace process and the crucial importance of the u.s. leadership in resuming the palestinian-israeli negotiations based on the two-state solution. there is simply no other formula, no other -- two-state solution is the only way to go and if you compare that also with the radicalization of syria, together with the peace process, this is going to be a serious threat to an already volatile region. i believe there is a window of opportunity to m
increases, even some stimulus money to try to get the economy going. but it's significant that they're fighting at a lower level of intensity and turmoil. notice that the congress left for easter break without a crisis over a government shutdown. there was no crisis over potential debt limit, and government default earlier this year. could come back this summer but so long as it lasts, that's calming for the markets and good for the economy, and it may, lester, leave some space still for a compromise in which democrats would agree to changes in cuts in medicare and social security, and republicans would come up with a little bit more tax revenue, lester. >> all right, john harwood tonight, thank you. >>> president obama wrapped up his four-day visit to the middle east today, after helping israel and turkey end a three-year diplomatic dispute. that, in turn, will help the region deal with the civil war in syria. before he left today, the president turned his attention to the past, visiting jordan's ancient city of petra, one of the world's most celebrated archaeological sites. with t
. above 14,500. traders reacting to the word the federal reserve will take more steps to boost the economy through the program of buying up $85 billion in treasury and mortgage bonds. but the trouble in cyprus could threaten markets. officials are trying to find a new way to keep their own economy afloat after the parliament rejected a bailout that would have taxed its own citizens' bank accounts. the banks are closed the rest of the week. >>> where are we with this situation? >> in a standstill when it comes to cyprus. the parliament is betting the european union and central bank will not cut them off for -- not going through with the plan to tax deposits. they have almost a week to negotiate. next tuesday is when the banks open up. in the back channels with russia on financial support, so it seems they're hoping they can find a stopgap. >> shepard: what i didn't understand was the real problem with this situation in spy russ is the russians, who have been laundering money, have stashed so much money in the banks, the banks are bigger than the economy in the country. so they could have ta
.s. economy and u.s. institutions are the safest in the world and will be a beneficiary. lou: we watched eight straight records on the dow. 10 straight wins on the dow. but this has been an impressive performance. if it time to say we will see you in four or five points from here, i would look at prospect of a correction, what do you think? >> we have gone pretty far, pretty fast. in an interest rate environment. look at it from a relative basis, so that the equity market is pretty interesting place to be. we really haven't seen for a while. lou: we will get some indications on the housing market, we will look at building permits primarily, what are you expecting? >> still think the housing market is in pretty good shape, but if you look at the opportunity out there, seeing some places the housing market is doing pretty well, seeing a lot of the excess capacity in the marketplace, in a zero interest environment, a fair amount of the capacity, investment classes come in and actually bought up a fair amount of those equities. are we going back to the old days, absolutely not. lou: sean matthews,
. >> sreenivasan: the federal reserve stood by its aggressive plan to stimulate the u.s. economy, keeping short-term interest rates at record lows. and it said there are signs the economy is getting stronger. one of those signs-- unemployment-- fell to a four- year low of 7.7% in february. still, the fed predicted it won't reach 6.5% until 2015. the fed and its chairman, ben bernanke, also had words of caution for congress. >> i do believe that long-term fiscal stability is extremely important and i urge congress and the administration, as i always do when i go to testify, to do whatever is necessary to put us on a sustainable fiscal path going forward. but in doing so, i think it's a good idea to pay attention to the impacts in the near term on what is still not a completely satisfactory recovery. >> sreenivasan: congress moved a step closer to advancing a spending bill that would keep the federal government running through september. the senate passed the legislation this afternoon along bipartisan lines. the measure funds the day-to-day operating budgets of every cabinet agency, gives $87 bi
in jobs in the economy, and closes loopholes and preserves the middle class' ability to grow and proceed. so, we now are, you know, in this 30-hour thing. we could actually be debating the budget while those 30 hours tick. we don't have to be sitting here doing nothing. and one of our colleagues said, he'd like to debate the budget two weeks from now. why is he putting things off? well, i guess if i had their budget and looked at it compared to our budget, that's what i'd want to do. but that's not fair and that's not right. so i just came to the floor to join my colleague from washington in pleading with our colleagues, let's have a real debate on the budget. the lines are squarely -- are sharply drawn. our budget and your budget contrast. let the american people hear the debate and decide who they like. we're pretty confident they'd like ours better. you no longer have the talking point, we don't have a budget. so instead you're preventing us from talking about our budget. it is not fair, not right, and doesn't really help the process. so i would hope that i know there are some members
economy and creates good jobs that american people need to support their families. we must balance our budget for our students. those who are currently in our universities and community colleges should feel confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, m
to the economy generally to gun control. you know, just on gun control there's been a lot of things that have been happening over just even the past few weeks. i was in colorado a couple weeks ago, and it's the first time i've kind of heard of a white house getting involved in the passage of state legislation where the big news when i was there was, apparently, vice president joe biden had just been calling up members of the state legislature there kind of lobbying them, saying that if they voted the right way, the president would help campaign for them this next year, and if they voted the wrong way, they may end up facing primary opponents. and according to legislators i talked to there, there was about seven democrats who had switched their votes enough to get four gun control bills through the statehouse. so there's a lot of things tar happening right now. -- that are happening right now. but what i'd like to try to start off with is the general issue of health care, because i think we've had the best health care system in the world, and i'm just going to briefly go through some of the ch
of family relationships than by the parents' sexual orientation. >>> coming up, when will the economy be healthy enough to stand on its own? according to fed chief ben bernanke, not for a while. we'll tell you all about it, coming up next. [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ male announcer ] how about v8 v-fusion. a full serving of vegetables, a full serving of fruit. but what you taste is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. glass on floors. daily chores. for the little mishaps you feel use neosporin to help you heal. it kills germs so you heal four days faster. neosporin. use with band-aid brand bandages. neosporin. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact that i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. join toda
at $500 since 1999. it's been pretty flat. we are getting more jobs. the economy is getting better but at a lower rate than it should be. we lost over 700,000 government jobs during the obama administration despite all the right wing talk about him the fact is the deficit is getting smaller and there are fewer and fewer government jobs. the addition of jobs we had last month, 236,000 jobs, 70 those of those were business service jobs. that's a good sign for the future. accountants office workers being hired that employeers expect more business in the future. but the sequester and the press for austerity and the increase of social security tax are all slowing our progress to where we should be. >> michael: of course these companies would be hiring accountants now because they're making so much damn money because they're not paying enough wages to their workers. that's part and parcel of how it works. >> yes remember a fundamental tenant of the chicago school and i went to the chicago school is to get rid of unions, that means driving down wages. i just reported in my column in tax a
economy, look at that. >> what do they do? >> they make air conditioning equipment and that's why -- and in a modular way so it can be expanded when you're in a commercial air conditioning you can add units to it along the way. >> what about ann? >> it's not one i'm looking at now. in fact, i'm looking at these banks and there is talk of them collapsing in cyprus. many are doing well like in japan. japan's banks collapsed but it was 20 years ago. nom nomoro is strong. this is one that i own and i think it should be in your portfolio. >> what about u.s. banks? do we kind of made them very whole over the last couple years. >> and they are strong, bank of america not too far off from its high. financials here or abroad, maybe cyprus but not here at home. >> we'll leave it there. and here is a story you need to know. a girl scout troop getting pranked, someone ordering 6,000 boxes of the cookies totaling 24 grand. it was a scam and the girls were left with unsold cookies. americans are coming to the rescue buying around 4,000 boxes last saturday and you can help them get the last laug
deal with the economy. the senate plan calls for $46.5 trillion in spending, nearly $5 trillion more than the house plan and more revenue an additional $1 billion more than the house plan. the biggest difference would be the impact on the nation's ballooning deficit. the senate plan is projected to cut spending by $975 billion over the next ten year. in the same time the house plan would cut a lot more. $6 trillion nearly. and if all this is not enough number crunching for you president obama is expected to release his budget plan in early april. of course, we will take a look and report. >>> europe holding its collective breath time as the nation of cypress teethers on bankruptcy. a lot of wealthy europeans particularly russians park their money in cyprus bank. if the financial system fails. they will be asked to foot the bill for the bailout of the bank. we started seeing how they might pay with talk of a 20% tax on bank deposits. a chance the banks to collapse by tuesday there. >> reporter: harris that is absolutely right. unless there is a bailout deal and reportedly that could b
for your health if you live in a high supply sexual economy where stds are on the rise or risk unwanted pregnancy. there are reasons celibacy is good for your health. i couldn't find one bit of data being bad for your health. >> i love how you just say it, wendy. that's why you have you have on. >> i just say it. just because you're not having sex doesn't mean you're not ejaculating. you know that. you sleep in a man's body every night. you know how it works. >> okay. not all sex but physical touch is necessary. there are programs for older folks who get things like massage because they need it. right? >> we do know nonsexual touch is one of the best life enhancing thing out there. in my book when i ask girls to get off the hook-up to schedule a massage. they will miss touch. touch is an important thing. we are seeing the rise of pets with single people. we need to reach out and get used to nonsexual touch as a good thing. >> okay. >> there are some now that not only are embracing celibacy, they are hitting the reset button even. they are called born again virgins. talk to me about it.
it again. cyprus is only the third smallest economy in the euro zone. if it has to devalue its currency, then do we have a domino fall and a fall in other places, spain, italy, and then do we see the whole thing going over with greece and the rest? >> and impacts us, and people may begin to take some of their money out of stocks here at home. >> what happens, people flee, basically, to quality. the dollar go up and treasuries being bought and see people getting out of risky things such as stocks. >> harris: you're the silver lining person on fox report weekend. you always find it for us and say later on in the week no matter what happens, if we feel a hiccup, if we don't, because of this week and cyprus and european problems over there, we have some good news coming? >> plenty to move the markets this week, and we have news on housing, both on prices and pending home sales and prices across the country and he we also have consumer confidence which has been quite high. so the housing rebound is something that's been pushing the bulls and they have been very resilient. we've seen them run
that has to do with the smart investments that we know we need to get the economy growing again, those are off the table. big tax cuts for the wealthiest americans that has to be made up by somebody and we know who that somebody is. >> thank you for coming in. there is no huge surprise that the ryan budget overwhelmingly passed in the house or that it failed in in the senate, but three senators voting against it, rand paul, ted cruz, mike lee. that's a new thing, tea partiers saying i'm even more conservative than paul ryan. is that the message? >> yeah. that is the message and also 2016 is the message. two of those three folks you mentioned have presidential ambitio ambitions. the rhine why we're in this situation in the first place is the inability to come together and pass a real budget. and really we see a new base rhine where these big tee bates are taking place, but the new sort of normal is the spending levels that were set by sequestration. and so yesterday we did see congress pass, pass a continuing resolution, pass a stopgap spending bill that went to the white house. and it
a two day meeting on the economy this afternoon. then fed chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference. we will have live coverage of his remarks to reporters at 2:30 eastern on c-span3. here's some of what we're covering this morning. the house is expected to finish work on the republican budget of the 2014 budget. live coverage of 10:00 eastern on c-span. on c-span2, the senate is working on a measure to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcom
building and strongest economy? now, an economist named andrew lawrence is behind something called the skyscraper index which shows that the construction of very tall buildings is actually a great way to predict the onset of economic changes. so here's how it works. when a skyscraper begins construction, everybody is all excited, ebuhl yent, right, the country is growing. usually too excited and there is a dramatic plunge in the economic outlook of a country. but according to the index, once the skyscraper has finally finished, the economy will be climbing back. one world trade center will be america's tallest tower when it is completed next year. and even though americans' confidence in the economy is bad, our new tallest building seems to indicate things are looking up. hey, you know, i know it's just one tower. and sure, it's a rather thin hope. but if thein be detection holds true, america's economy is going to be in a way better place, a lot sooner than anybody thought. anderson cooper starts now. >> erin, thanks. good evening, everyone. a very big night tonight, including the
has no interest in our economy, he has no real interest in straightening out our budget problems. i don't know what his priorities are, but they certainly aren't straightening out the tremendous debt that we've accumulated under his presidency. >> greta: and the senate should note that other presidents should know that other presidents have been late, but this is the first time the president didn't get the budget before the house and senate and we waited and supposed to get it early april, but maybe. mayor, listen to this the national debt we all owe stands at more than 16 trillion dollars, so are president obama and speaker of the house, john boehner, both in denial or are they drinking the same stuff? >> i think it's important to recognize is that we've already cut 2.5, 2.7 trillion dollars out of the deficit. if the sequester stays in you've got over 3 1/2 trillion dollars of deficit reduction already so we don't have an immediate crisis in terms of debt. in fact for the next ten years it's in sustainable place. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis, but we all know we have
to work sick costs the economy $180 billion each year in lost productivity. >>> and it's gross. >> in the guest spot, thanks so much for being with us. >> my pleasure. thank you. >> so some of the research that i've seen from cornell university actually shows that moms are penalized more than dads when they do take sick days to take care of their kids or they have to take off work to be able to take care of their kids, their family, a loved one. does having a standard baseline get it that problem and hopefully equalize the employer response to taking sick days? >> well, it helps women in several days. women are less likely to have it. more likely to need it since they do most of the care giving. but they also need men to share that care giving and more men will do so if they don't get punished for it at work. >> i wanted to pick up on something she was talking about, this might be good for the economy. some say they would rather make their own productivity decisions. i'm wondering what you think about the context of a decision and trying to build support for this kind of federa
with the casino's owner since it opened two years ago. >>> so just where is the economy headed? according to ben bernanke, the economy is improving, however, interest rates will stay low for now and until unemployment falls below 6.5%. >>> more economic clues today from nike after the bell investors will be looking at the global retailer's future orders. china trends and gross margins for a read on consumer demand in china and here at home. >>> expectations are climbing for this morning's february existing home sales numbers which are seen coming in higher than january. >>> and cash strapped cyprus, banks are still closed and late night meetings broke up with no new plan b to fund the island's much needed bailout. >>> closer to home, cvs is weighing in on the policy requiring employees to record their weight and body fat or face a health insurance premium. all data collected during health screenings is private. >>> fans of starbucks will be happy to know that beginning in may they can also rack up rewards points with packaged coffee purchases at grocery and drug stores. >>> meanwhile, walmart is
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